Happy New Year 2021!

Will a soul food fixin’ of ‘Hoppin’ John’ be a part of your New Year’s celebration meal today? If not, it really should be and here’s why . . .

Hoppin John by Chef BJ Dennis

Hoppin’ John is a dish made of rice, peas, and pork usually served and eaten in the Southern United States on New Year’s Day! This mixture, which was the subsistence of enslaved West Africans en route to the Americas, is believed to bring good luck. Just add greens (collards, mustards, or cabbage) which represents money to your plate and you’ll have a meal of prosperity to kick off the New Year!

Continue reading

My Birthday is the Perfect Day to Honor my Ancestors

September 19th is not only my birthday, but a day I dedicate to all the ancestors in my family tree. Why this particular day? Without their blood, endurance, strength, and tears there would be no “me,” or a birthday on this day to celebrate.

I often wonder what my ancestors would think if they could see, hear, and be near me in this time and place on September 19, 2020. Well . . . I’d like to believe that the t-shirt I wore today below captures their thoughts and then some . . .Don’t you agree?

I Am My Ancestors' Wildest Dreams

Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr.

Just after 6 pm on April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at age 39, was assassinated while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. He was in Memphis to support a sanitation workers’ strike. He was preparing to leave the motel to go to dinner when a bullet struck him in the jaw and severed his spinal cord. Dr. King was pronounced dead after his arrival at a Memphis hospital. I was 8 or 9 years old when he was assassinated and saw how his death affected my family and our friends in the community and at church. I could not help thinking about how did his children feel about losing their father in this awful way.

YouVersion’s exclusive conversation with Rev. Dr. Bernice A. King below gives me some insight on what I often wondered — how were the King children coping emotionally and mentally through the years over their father’s death. I suspected there was anger towards white people in general. But despite her anger over what happened, it’s comforting to hear how the power of God’s Word is how she found the ability to forgive. I love her challenge to us to take God at his word when she said, ” . . . we too can tap into that same power today, in order to practice true justice towards others: by walking in mercy and humility. When you start practicing in this vein — doing justice, and loving mercy — it invites God into the equation and gives Him room to operate.”

A Conversation with Rev. Dr. Bernice A. King: His Word Does Not Return Void

Isaish 55:11 – “so shall My word be that goeth forth out of My mouth: It shall not return unto Me void . . .”